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Kate Telfer23/09/2016 9:19 AMIdeas0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/Blog/PublishingImages/Anywhere%20is%20possible%20-%20mountain.jpg
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When learning is unconstrained it unlocks a world of possibility​

​​

At Chisholm Online, we’re ready to make ‘anywhere’ possible for you. Turning your aspirations into reality is possible when you have access to a full range of flexible support services throughout your learning journey; from course advisors, to e-tutors, to your student engagement team. ​

For Amy McLean who studied for a Diploma in Community Services to pathway into a degree in social welfare, Chisholm Online was one of the only online environments that was able to help her pursue her goal.

“If people have a dream and feel they can’t achieve it, studying online at Chisholm Online actually lets you work towards that dream,” she said.

“The engagement team is terrific. When you’re a bit older and don’t always have the confidence because there’s been a few gaps since you’ve studied before, having those people behind you, boosting you up and giving you the confidence, helps you along the way.”

Amy Hatherall agrees. She wants to start a career in mental health and is studying a dual Diploma of Mental Health and Alcohol and Other Drugs. “I was a bit nervous going into the course as I thought it was just going to be me and doing it all alone, but there are so many tools for communicating with staff and students – emails, events, forums – I really didn’t feel alone in the end.”

And with a part-time job and heavy involvement with two charity organisations, one of which is a major 4000km cycling event from Melbourne to Cairns that will raise funds for cancer research and patient care, Chisholm Online has given Amy the flexibility she needs.

“I’m one of the 25 riders, so to be able to train, work and have a good life balance fundraising and organising health promotion programs, Chisholm Online has been incredible so far. If I have a meeting, shift at work or training scheduled, I’m able to study at my own time and pace. I believe flexibility is an essential part of growing as a person; a good characteristic for those wanting to work in the mental health industry.   

As Chisholm Online​ General Manager, Theo Teeder explains, our courses will give you the confidence to take that crucial step towards pursuing your dream. “We future-proof your investment by building qualifications that offer graduates the best chance of getting a new job, promotion or getting back into the workforce,” he said. 

“We’re focusing on courses in business, health, construction and education – currently the top employing industries projected for the highest growth in the next five years. So not only are our students gaining a nationally-recognised qualification, but a qualification that is in demand.” 

In Jeanette’s case, she secured a promotion at her workplace after completing a Graduate Certificate in Management. “So I’m now one step further in the management career I’m after.”

And for Emma, who has been studying for a Diploma of Early Childhood Education, it’s about expanding her career options while enjoying motherhood. “It means I can follow my passions and dreams to work with younger children and I’m able to do it with having a child,” she said. 

Theo Teeder: “We’ve created a safety net, a support structure so you’re unlikely to fail throughout your learning journey. That’s why we have one of the highest retention rates of students returning term after term to complete what they set out to do – to achieve their career aspirations.”

“That’s the investment we make in terms of our learning materials, the quality of teaching support through the rigorous selection of our teachers, and the wraparound services of our student engagement team operating seven days a week, which includes technical support, study tips and on-going encouragement for our students.”

At Chisholm Online, anywhere is possible. Are you ready for anywhere?​​

For more information on all our courses, visit Chisholm Online​ or speak with a course advisor on 1300 275 265. 

But hurry. Enrolments close 7 October ​


Item is currently unrated.Are you ready for anywhere?Post23/09/2016 9:35 AM46023/09/2016 9:35 AMKate TelferAre you ready for anywhere?Chisholm Online
​​At Chisholm Online, we’re ready to make ‘anywhere’ possible for you. Turning your aspirations into reality is possible when you have access to a full range of flexible support services throughout your learning journey; from course advisors, to e-tutors, to your student engagement team. ​
Kate Telfer14/09/2016 1:33 PMIdeas0Job ready

​Have you ever asked for feedback from a job interview and been informed that you weren't job ready? Or perhaps you are wondering why you aren't getting calls after submitting your resume. The overwhelming trend job recruiters are seeing in the market is a lack of, what they call, 'job readiness'. So what exactly is it to be job ready and how can you achieve this?​

Employability and talent specialist Rebecca Fraser says, "Being job ready starts at understanding the job through to understanding the future of the job. But there are some key things that will ensure you are perceived as being job ready in your next interview".

  1. Have the right skills and qualifications for the job
    It seems a given, however there are a lot of people out there who just apply for jobs without looking at exactly what the needs are. While it's hard to completely fill the job requirements, if you have some of these skills and are familiar with the skills you need to have to do the job, you will go a long way to being ready to start in that job.

  2. Understand your gaps
    "Ok, so you may not have all of the skills and qualifications asked for in the job, but what are you doing to work on building these to increase your competence in the role? Are you being mentored, are you undertaking training, and are you practicing your skill set? You may not be able to tick the yes box, but if you can talk to what you are doing to address the gap you will look a lot more attractive!", says Rebecca

  3. Know how that role fits in to an organisation
    You'll never be expected to know the organisations structure up front, but if you understand the purpose of the role within an organisation, you will be able to demonstrate how your additional skills can enhance your success in the role.

  4. Have a career plan
    "At this stage your career plan may be just to get a new job, but having a career plan is actually really important to organisations", Rebecca explains. "By having a career plan you will generally have a greater understanding of what having this job actually means for your future, and for the needs of the organisation. It will also ensure that you understand how this position may change in the future; how advancements in technology may change the dynamics of your role and how you have catered for this in your career plan".

  5. Be able to communicate with confidence
    "Introvert or extravert, this is not important. Communicating with confidence is about your ability to talk with someone about who you are, what you do and why you can do this job", says Rebecca. Each position will have its own specific needs in relation to how you need to communicate, and being able to recognise this and communicate effectively to suit your role and industry is important.

If you feel a qualification will help you become job ready, have you considered online study? Chisholm Online qualifications are nationally recognised and have been chosen to meet industry demand. Best of all they're flexible, so you can study whenever and wherever suits you. Visit Chisholm Online​ for a full list of courses.

Item is currently unrated.How to become job readyPost12/09/2016 2:32 PM45014/09/2016 1:43 PMKate TelferHow to become job readyChisholm Online
The overwhelming trend job recruiters are seeing in the market is a lack of, what they call, 'job readiness'. So what exactly is it to be job ready and how can you achieve this? Employability and talent specialist Rebecca Fraser says, "Being job ready starts at understanding the job through to understanding the future of the job. But there are some key things that will ensure you are perceived as being job ready in your next interview".
Kate Telfer2/09/2016 4:35 PMOpinions0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/Blog/PublishingImages/Clare%20blog.jpg
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As Head of Teaching at Chisholm Online​, Clare Nelson knows it's vital that students find their learning tools engaging and interactive.  She says, "Creating our learning resources here at Chisholm Online is a lengthy but rewarding process. A team of writers, subject matter experts, assessment specialists and instructional designers, all work together to make the final product you see in Moodle". But where do they start?

Firstly, the qualification requirements are mapped out giving the team an overview of what needs to be covered. The subject experts and writers then work in parallel with the assessment specialists to write the content ensuring it aligns closely with the assessment. As Clare says, "The online environment gives us so much more scope for variety compared to print resources as we include relevant websites, videos, podcasts and interactive tasks so the students can explore what information and support is available online".  This enables students to continue their learning and update their industry knowledge long after they have graduated.

Then it's over to the instructional designers who give the content a multimedia treatment to bundle together text, video, and audio files. It's at this stage that interactive tasks are created so students can check their understanding before having to do the assessments. The instructional designers add in colours and imagery to make the content engaging and exciting but also complementary of the concepts in the course.   

What about the assessments? Well, depending on the qualification, some are project based and some have to be completed in the workplace.  What happens when we have an assessment that falls outside of those categories? According to Clare, "That's when the fun starts!"  "We make animations with characters in real-life scenarios, giving the student questions throughout. The scenario enfolds according to the student's answers". A sound booth is then used to add voices to the characters in the animations. These assessments are realistic, fun to do and are very popular with the students.

As Chisholm Online student Casey says, "The content is different and never boring. Some of the slides are spoken to you and the ones that aren’t are fun! There are small quizzes and tests as well as graphs and games. It’s really well developed!"​

If online learning sounds like it might work for you, visit Chisholm Online for a full list of our courses. Our next enrolment deadline is October 7.​

Item is currently unrated.Building online learning content to suit you, the studentPost2/09/2016 4:41 PM4407/09/2016 2:53 PMKate TelferBuilding online learning content to suit you, the studentChisholm Online
​As Head of Teaching at Chisholm Online​, Clare Nelson knows it's vital that students find their learning tools engaging and interactive.  She says, "Creating our learning resources here at Chisholm Online is a lengthy but rewarding process.  A team of writers, subject matter experts, assessment specialists and instructional designers, all work together to make the final product you see in Moodle". But where do they start?
Kate Telfer11/07/2016 2:22 PMOpinions0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/Blog/PublishingImages/Stand%20out%20new.jpg
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​"Absolutely", says teacher Patricia Dodd who developed the Graduate Certificate in Management​ (GCM) course content and assessments for Chisholm Online.

"GCM is designed for those who have significant industry experience looking to expand and affirm their knowledge and skills with a qualification, helping them step up to the next level in their career."

And with the latest Department of Employ​​ment report on Australian jobs projecting a growth of 9.2% or 140,000 jobs in management over the next five years to 2020, graduate students are well placed to take up new career challenges. 

This is a short duration management qualification that is also a pathway to an MBA, perfect for those who have already completed a diploma or degree or have at least five years of industry experience.

"Typically, our students hold a supervisor or team leader role with the intention of applying for a management position. Many are project managers in a specialist construction or engineering field and are looking for a solid management qualification to help them move into a broader role within their field," said Patricia.

Bigger role, higher pay

For Sean Winter from WA, it was employment uncertainty that triggered his decision to enrol in the GCM, ultimately securing him a new senior position.

"When I learnt that the contract under which I was employed was open to competitive tender, I knew it was time for me to pursue graduate studies," said Sean. "I had 18 years of experience at Barrow Island managing the airport's administration but without a formal qualification."

He wanted a course that would give him the confidence to apply for a senior position with a new company and the credibility to back up his many years of management experience.

"I now have 12 ground handlers reporting directly to me in my new role, which I believe can be attributed to my success with Chisholm Online's Graduate Certificate in Management," he said. "And I was also able to negotiate a higher pay rate with this added responsibility."

Meanwhile at Barrow Island Airport, Sean was able to put the lessons from the course's leading innovation module and managing change unit to good use, when airport management was officially handed over from one company to another.

"We had a major gas plant being built, a helicopter hanger undergoing a total refurbishment of electrical wiring and lighting, at the same time the airport administration changed hands. A strict adherence to the management of change process enabled us to achieve all objectives without any interruption to flight schedules and services, and without any negative impact on passenger experience," said Sean.

Leadership and strategic growth

Tom Williamson is managing director of his family's real estate company. Initially looking for a short-term graduate qualification to recognise his diverse management capabilities in a range of small businesses, Tom has come away with much more than affirmation.

"I've learnt what it really takes to be a leader, and its difference to being a manager," said Tom. "How to think differently and communicate differently to develop innovation; how to use best practice methodology and tools for strategic planning and project planning."

"This course has helped guide the development of my business. We have already started strategically planning and restructuring our business for growth," he said.

The next Graduate Certificate in Management intake is in July. Visit chisholmonline.edu.au​ for more information or call and speak with a Course Advisor on 1300 275 265.​

Item is currently unrated.Can a Graduate Certificate in Management really help advance your career?Post11/07/2016 1:23 PM43011/07/2016 2:27 PMKate TelferCan a Graduate Certificate in Management really help advance your career?Chisholm Online
GCM is designed for those who have significant industry experience looking to expand and affirm their knowledge and skills with a qualification, helping them step up to the next level in their career. And with the latest Department of Employment report on Australian jobs projecting a growth of 9.2% or 140,000 jobs in management over the next five years to 2020, graduate students are well placed to take up new career challen
Kate Telfer8/07/2016 10:05 AMOpinions0Put your training to work
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​Liz Atkinson is a payroll and human resource administrator. Three years ago, she started learning on the job, steadily building her knowledge and experience over time. But something felt incomplete.

"I didn't have any formal qualifications for my role and I could see that it could be limiting as I advanced in my career," says Liz. "I wanted to upskill and broaden my knowledge, which is why I decided to study for a Diploma in Human Resource Management."

Following nine months of study with Chisholm Online, usually after full-time work hours, Liz achieved her objectives: confidence and validation.

"This is me saying, hey! I'm qualified to do this job and I know exactly why," laughs Liz, explaining that while her job hasn't changed, she now has a different mindset on how she approaches her work."

"It's no more about my personal point of view. It's been replaced by a fresh business perspective," says Liz. "I understand and can explain why things need to be done a certain way; the benefits; the importance; the impact on other departments and aspects of the business."

Her employer, Justin Burgoine, Managing Director at Kincrome, agrees. "Not only can we see the benefits for the development of Liz, but she's now passing that on through even myself and also back through the rest of the business where we're implementing new programs and procedures. So it's been a benefit for everybody."

As Liz explains, the best thing about Chisholm Online​ is the flexibility to study at a time that best suits you. 

"The level of service they provide is fantastic. The support from the teachers, the support from the engagement staff, I would recommend it to anyone who wants to study," she said.

For more information about Chisholm Online and courses, visit chisholmonline.edu.au​ or call on 1300 275 265 and speak directly with the Course Advisor team. ​

Item is currently unrated.Put your training to work – Liz’s storyPost8/07/2016 10:29 AM42018/07/2016 12:51 PMKate TelferPut your training to work – Liz’s storyChisholm Online
"I wanted to upskill and broaden my knowledge, which is why I decided to study for a Diploma in Human Resource Management," explains Liz. Following nine months of study with Chisholm Online, usually after full-time work hours, Liz achieved her objectives: confidence and validation.
Kate Telfer22/06/2016 7:42 PMIdeas0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/Blog/PublishingImages/Job%20search.jpg

Looking at how you can do things a little bit differently may be the answer to your job search woes. Each of us has a unique approach to how we communicate with people for some it can be quite innovative. We have all heard about the graduate in the US whose cover letter went viral and resulted in numerous job offers. Well, it was only through his innovation and marrying his job search strategy with his personality that he achieved the result that he did.

So what can you do?

Little things can make a difference in your job search. If you are doing the same thing over and over again and not achieving a result, then have a think about what would make you respond if you were a prospective employer. Ideas that people have taken to include:

  1. Picking up the phone and calling someone in your network of old work colleagues. Offer to buy them a coffee instead for a change and see if they know anyone that might be interested in your skills.

  2. Contact the organisations that you have worked for previously, or those that require your skill set, and ask them what their hiring process is. This is best done on the phone but sometimes emails can also achieve a result.

  3. Contact an old manager (that you got along with!) and ask for their support in your job search. 

  4. Contact all the individuals that you have had interviews with. Ask for feedback and ask them if they know of any up and coming positions. Again shout them a coffee for a change.

Some people have gone outside of the box in their job search and although we do not recommend taking on these ideas without having a plan in place, it might inspire you to think about other ideas that could work for you.

  1. Creating a Facebook/LinkedIn page inviting others to join and provide some information on the positions that you are applying for.

  2. Write a job search blog; you never know who might be interested in following such a thing.

  3. Attend a networking group with a business card where your position is "Available for all work opportunities" plus the industry or role that you are targeting.

Direct letters to organisations and phone calls are great but if they haven't been successful then it might be beneficial to change your approach.​

Have a think about being a little creative in your job search to build a network of opportunities. Remember however, you need to have a plan that remains professional and reflects your personality.

 ​

Rebecca Fraser is a senior career coach and Director of Rebecca Fraser Consulting​.

 

Item is currently unrated.Job hunting getting you down? 7 better ways to find a jobPost22/06/2016 7:47 PM41012/07/2016 9:48 PMRaja GanesanJob hunting getting you down? 7 better ways to find a jobRebecca Fraser
Little things can make a difference in your job search. If you are doing the same thing over and over again and not achieving a result, then have a think about what would make you respond if you were a prospective employer.
Kate Telfer22/06/2016 7:11 PM03 ways to make your resume stand out

First impressions matter a lot. But while we put a great emphasis on our physical presentation when attending a meeting or interview, it is becoming more and more evident that we are all forgetting when the first impression actually occurs; before the interview, before even a phone call.

In today's job market we are all aware that our resume and our LinkedIn profiles are the key tools for initially getting noticed. When preparing these, focus on the following to make the best first impression, one that truly reflects who you are.

1. Write a solid resume. Triple check it to ensure there are no glaring issues that immediately raise concerns for the reviewer. These concerns may be raised by:

    1. Spelling mistakes 

    2. Inconsistencies in dates

    3. Unexplained gaps in employment

    4. Incorrect contact details

    5. Poor formatting

    6. Incorrect grammar or language.

2. Ensure your LinkedIn profile mirrors the dates and core information contained in your resume. Inconsistencies across the 2 documents will raise concerns.

3. Qualify your experience through testimonials. Ask openly in your network for recommendations and testimonials as these will enhance the impact of your first impression.

Get your resume right and then get your LinkedIn profile right. Most importantly, take a structured approach to your job search starting at the beginning; plan your marketing strategy and then prepare the documents needed to get you there.


Rebecca Fraser is a senior career coach and Director of Rebecca Fraser Consulting​.​​​

Item is currently unrated.3 ways to make your resume stand out Post22/06/2016 7:21 PM40022/06/2016 7:49 PMKate Telfer3 ways to make your resume stand out Rebecca Fraser
In today's job market we are all aware that our resume and our LinkedIn profiles are the key tools for initially getting noticed. When preparing these, focus on the following to make the best first impression, one that truly reflects who you are.
Kate Telfer10/06/2016 11:44 AMOpinions0Put your training to work
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​This June Chisholm has launched a new mid-year campaign under the heading of 'Put your training to work'. In as much as a headline can deliver a campaign message, it is important in highlighting what we stand for, what our students can expect for their hard work and how to geting the most reward for their efforts. These efforts are more than being engaged in their online learning – this is a given through well designed courses and expert online teacher support. It is about knowing student motivation and goals for why they are studying and where we sit in that journey. We see it with all types of students that embark on courses with Chisholm Online; we see it with students like Amy who was volunteering as a social worker while studying with COL. The centre was so impressed with the skills she was developing through her studies with Chisholm Online, they offered her a paid position. We see it with Sonia, whose passion for team sports and coaching led her to pursue a career in education through studying with Chisholm Online. Now Sonia has a full-time job at the childcare centre where she did her work placement.

Beginning with the goal in mind is clearly important. Choosing an education provider that is well resourced and professional in its approach can be the difference between completing and achieving your goals or falling short. What is less obvious are the career options and industry areas that give students their best chance of success. This is where we can add the extra layer to the standard course offerings. We focus on courses that are both in-demand now as well as looking at the future trends of the workforce and how certain industries are predicted to continue to grow.
For example, employment within the education and training sector is expected to increase by 13% by 2020*. Similarly, by 16.4% in health care and by 8.3% in the construction industry*. This is why we have focused on offering courses within these three sectors, as well as a broad set of business qualifications which remain integral for all industries.

In essence, this is what 'Put your training to work' is all about – get the best rewards now with a real qualification that improves job outcomes and puts you in a stronger position for the future. This is vocational education and training delivered by Chisholm. Visit www.chisholm.edu.au/proven for more information.

 ​

*Labour Market Information Portal, 2016, lmip.gov.au

Item is currently unrated.Put your training to workPost10/06/2016 11:49 AM39010/06/2016 1:32 PMKate TelferPut your training to workTheo Teeder
This June Chisholm has launched a new mid-year campaign under the heading of 'Put your training to work'. In as much as a headline can deliver a campaign message, it is important in highlighting what we stand for, what our students can expect for their hard work and how to get the most reward for their efforts.
Kate Telfer16/05/2016 1:09 PMOpinions0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/Blog/PublishingImages/Teachers_image.jpg
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​Australia's high education standards have developed a large pool of qualified teachers with specialist subject knowledge. So what makes COL teachers special? Manager of Chisholm's Professional Educator College, Brad Beach, explains that online learning is a designed virtual classroom with a vibrant connected community. It is a learning experience that requires leadership from educators who value the power of communication and support in nurturing student achievement.

Research by renowned digital learning innovator, Gilly Salmon, has shown that the top reason for students logging into an online learning space is to see if anyone has responded to them. And students learn best when they feel valued and connected to others when studying.

Community Vs Isolation

"Online learning is a fundamental paradigm shift from self-paced distance learning where students often study in isolation. Chisholm Online is a community learning space where learners feel connected and safe with a teacher who believes in their abilities and is passionate about supporting them," says Brad.

In addition, all programs are built in-line with Chisholm's Educational Excellence Framework that ensures all aspects of the learners' experience are of the highest possible quality. 

"So beyond teaching qualifications, experience and subject knowledge, our online teachers who are benchmarked against key capabilities within the Educational Excellence Framework, have a distinctive attitude and philosophy about their role as educators."

"They are good communicators who build connectedness in an online community; they value each student and what they bring to the group; they support by keeping them on track; and they encourage by helping them break down their learning into achievable goals over short periods of time."

Teachers who share your journey

COL teachers come from a variety of backgrounds and learning experiences themselves. Often they've also had career changes and have returned to further study. They have empathy and are absolutely committed to helping students succeed.

I've been there before

Ann Murray, teacher in leadership & management

When Ann started studying for a Bachelor of Applied Science in Agriculture, she was a mature aged student, already married with two young children. For 12 years after receiving her degree, she worked in the horticulture industry, managing two stone fruit orchards, later becoming an agronomist, selling soil moisture monitoring equipment to help farmers manage their pest, disease, fertilizer and irrigation programs. When a horticulture teaching opportunity came up at a TAFE, she jumped at it and discovered her true calling – being a teacher.

"My manager became my mentor and he showed me that I was also capable of teaching other subjects, which led me to business and management," says Ann.

"I'm now doing a PhD in Education researching the different ways students learn. I recognise that everyone learns differently and I'm good at explaining things, breaking complex issues down to their simplest form for each student that struggles with his or her understanding."

"I want to be there for all my students so I just keep talking to them so they know they are not alone, logging on daily to answer questions, even encouraging them with my own personal stories."

Collaborative learning is key

Karin Graham, teacher in accounting & human resource management:

Karin says she's lucky to have had a great mentor in her broad finance career which spans Melbourne and London, who showed her the power of knowledge sharing in developing people and teams. She's embraced this attitude in life and as a teacher, where she always looks for ways to make her students' journeys easier.

"For example, I create opportunities for the class to help, support and educate one another and I facilitate this type of communication," says Karin. "Every person, no matter their experience, education, place of birth or views has so much to offer in a group environment. The sharing of experiences, lessons and mistakes enhance their learning, particularly when stories are so much easier to remember than say a four bullet point slide."

Karin, who is a specialist in forensic accounting (fraud investigation) and has managed the financial teams of large insurance and accounting firms such as Deloitte, says it is important that students not only understand the lesson materials, but also why they are studying them, in order to apply what they've learnt in the workplace.

"Teaching in the online world requires a greater level of attention to student needs. If I cannot answer a question as soon as I see it, I let them know that I have seen the question and will get back to them."

Timely communication and support 

Carolyn Campbell, teacher in business administration

Carolyn has extensive administration and management experience in both the government and the private sectors, where she was largely responsible for training in organisational systems. After discovering that helping others achieve their goals gave her the most satisfaction, she undertook a diploma online, with an inspiring teacher, to become a COL teacher with a great track record for helping students complete successfully.

"I educate students on the importance of the subjects they are studying, getting them to relate to a real-life experience or a scenario in the workplace to put the learning into context, says Carolyn.

"Many of the online assessments are complex with lots of parts to them, so I break the assessment down, piece of piece, so they are not overwhelmed. Before they know it, they've actually worked through the assessment requirements and are ready to submit."

"Throughout the course, I encourage students by providing them with specific feedback and asking them questions to think about things differently if they are having trouble understanding an activity. I also keep them on track with regular reminders of where they should be up to at any given time during the study period."

"My greatest satisfaction is seeing students who have doubts about their ability, get through it and achieve what they didn't believe they were capable of learning."

Item is currently unrated.Teachers who make the grade – what makes Chisholm Online’s teachers so specialPost16/05/2016 1:14 PM38011/07/2016 12:50 PMKate TelferTeachers who make the grade – what makes Chisholm Online’s teachers so specialChisholm Online
What makes COL teachers special? Manager of Chisholm's Professional Educator College, Brad Beach, explains that online learning is a designed virtual classroom with a vibrant connected community. It is a learning experience that requires leadership from educators who value the power of communication and support in nurturing student achievement.
Natalie Mckelvie19/04/2016 8:13 AMOpinions0Because life's a balancing act

​When Ana Carolina Hernandez moved to Australia from Argentina in 2006, she found a niche teaching Spanish to primary aged students. It was during this time that she discovered her love for teaching children and decided that a diploma in early childhood education would broaden her job opportunities in this field.

But the time wasn’t right. She was starting a young family and her parents in Argentina couldn’t help out. She had already found the perfect course but was mentally prepared to only pursue it when her youngest started school – still a few years away.

Imagine her delight when she realised she could bring her study plans forward, right away. “It was never the right time for me; it was just impossible as a busy mother of two young children to attend classes,” said Ana. “But Chisholm Online has now made it possible. It is great to be able to do both, be a mother and study at the same time.”

Ana shares her thoughts on Chisholm Online’s Diploma in Early Childhood Education:

Flexibility to suit busy lives

“Flexibility is one of the greatest benefits for me. I can access my study materials anytime that suits me. Sometimes I study during the day when my older son is at school and my little one is taking a nap, or in the evening when both are asleep. If I can’t study during the week, I would catch up during the weekend. This is the perfect course that suits my busy life.”

Engagement that responds to individual needs

“The Student Engagement Team is great and always responds to my queries promptly. Last year my older son had emergency surgery and required my care, which put me behind in my studies. I didn’t think that I could finish the module but my teacher was so supportive. She provided me with extra help which enabled me to complete the module in time.”

A rich learning environment

“The learning content is diverse and interesting. There are readings, videos and links to extra material to expand our understanding on a particular subject. Forums are a great way to share concerns, ideas and experiences. If I have a question, I check the forum first to see if the issue has been raised and sometimes I not only find the issue, but the answer. I like the case studies because they provide clear examples of the situations that educators deal with. I also like the quizzes and forums with each topic because they help me to understand and reflect on that specific topic.”

Relevance that impacts practice

“This course has contributed significantly to my professional and personal growth. As an independent language teacher, I feel more confident knowing that I have the latest knowledge and tools to handle all kinds of situations. As a mother, I can use what I learn to manage and support my own children in reaching their goals. I have a deeper understanding in my children’s behaviour, where I look for triggers and use strategies to support them.  My favourite part of the course is work placement because it is the moment where I can put into practice what I’ve learnt from the many hours of reading and reflection. It is challenging and rewarding at the same time. Unexpected things happen and the learning experience is in constant movement.”

You’re not alone

“While you might be studying at home on your own, you’re never alone. Teachers and other students are in constant contact through messages and forums. The support and interaction is tremendous. You’ll never feel alone.”

Item is currently unrated.Why Chisholm Online is the perfect fitPost19/04/2016 8:12 AM37019/04/2016 8:17 AMNatalie MckelvieWhy Chisholm Online is the perfect fitSarah Jordan
​When Ana Carolina Hernandez moved to Australia from Argentina in 2006, she found a niche teaching Spanish to primary aged students. It was during this time that she discovered her love for teaching children and decided that a diploma in early childhood education would broaden her job opportunities in this field.
Natalie Mckelvie22/03/2016 12:20 PMOpinions0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/Blog/PublishingImages/MentalHealth-quals.jpg
5

Changes to training in mental health, alcohol and other drugs provide students more choice and the opportunity to specialise.
Healthcare and Social Assistance is the largest employing industry in Australia, representing more than 12 per cent of the total workforce*. And given it will be the number one growth industry by 2018, career prospects in the health sector look promising.

To respond to changing industry needs, and to provide better learning outcomes for students and employers alike, changes have been made to a key diploma-level qualification in the area.

The Diploma of Community Services (Alcohol, Other Drugs and Mental Health) has been replaced by two separate qualifications:  the Diploma of Mental Health and the Diploma of Alcohol and Other Drugs.

As Chisholm Online Head of Teaching Clare Nelson explains, this splitting of the two qualifications will deliver industry the flexibility it is looking for, while promoting workforce mobility.

Work placements – mandatory for both courses - will ensure students are assessed in the workplace and meet the on-the-job experience that employers want from new recruits.

These are all key features that employers, unions, government agencies, trainers and workers in the industry alike have told the Community Services and Health Industry Council – the body responsible for designing appropriate training for the sector  - are needed to meet the ever-increasing workforce demands in community services and health.

Of course, you might want to qualify in both the mental health field and the field of alcohol and other drugs. In this case, you can study both diplomas without the need to undertake double the study, as there are common skills taught across both qualifications.
So you can build on this common knowledge and specialise in both fields, boosting your employability across the sector.

So it’s over to you.  The choice is yours.  At Chisholm Online, we offer all three courses – Diploma in Mental Health, Diploma in Alcohol and Other Drugs and the Dual Diploma. To learn more about which course is best for you, visit chisholmonline.edu.au ,

*Source: Australian Government Department of Employment June 2014
*Source: http://www.cshisc.com.au/media-centre/latest-news/endorsement-of-chc-hlt-training-packages/

Item is currently unrated.Changes to training in mental health, alcohol and other drugs provide students more choice and the opportunity to specialisePost22/03/2016 12:24 PM36010/06/2016 11:52 AMKate TelferChanges to training in mental health, alcohol and other drugs provide students more choice and the opportunity to specialiseSarah Jordan
Changes to training in mental health, alcohol and other drugs provide students more choice and the opportunity to specialise.
Healthcare and Social Assistance is the largest employing industry in Australia, representing more than 12 per cent of the total workforce*. And given it will be the number one growth industry by 2018, career prospects in the health sector look promising.
Kate Telfer21/03/2016 10:00 AMIdeas0Brain Food
2

​Did you know eating certain foods can improve your ability to retain information and concentrate? So why not munch your way to better marks with these brain boosting foods?​​​

1. Oily fish

Bursting with omega-3 essential fatty acids, which have been proven to increase concentration and reduce mood swings, oily fish also reduces the likelihood of developing dementia as you age.  Go for salmon, sardines, flathead and trout.

2. Berries

Not only are berries full of antioxidants that reduce the amount of toxins in your body, they also contain phytonutrients and anthocyanins which increase the flow of blood and oxygen to your brain, making you sharper and more alert. Blueberries alone have been found to increase memory and concentration for up to five hours. In addition to blueberries; strawberries, raspberries, blackberries are all excellent choices.

3. Coffee

It's is no secret that caffeine rapidly increases our energy and ability to work faster. While the effects of caffeine aren't long lasting, there is no denying that it gives our bodies a fast and powerful energy boost when we need it. Just be wary of over-indulging and aim to keep caffeine levels to a healthy level, ideally limited to two cups of coffee a day.

4. Wholegrains

While refined carbohydrates like white bread and pasta can lead to fatigue and mental lethargy, however wholegrains have the opposite effect, fueling our bodies with long lasting energy. Wholegrains are low-GI, meaning glucose is released slowly into the bloodstream, giving you lasting energy for longer.  It is, however, important to balance carbohydrates with sufficient amounts of protein, as a diet too high in any form of carbohydrate will leave you feeling bloated and tired.  Brown rice, whole meal pasta, oats and bran are all low-GI wholegrain options to include in your study diet.

5. Spinach

Like berries, spinach and other leafy greens conta​​​​in high levels of antioxidants which increases brain function. Leafy greens are also high in vitamin B, carotenoids, and folic acid which are scientifically proven to aid memory, increase concentration, enhance overall cognitive function and reduce memory loss. Choose spinach, kale and broccoli, remembering the darker the leaf, the more good it will do you.

6. Chewing gum

Yes, we know gum is not a food. However studies have shown that chewing gum while studying can improve retention and concentration. One study in particular found that people who chewed gum while working on a stressful task were more mentally attentive than those who did the task without gum.

7. Nuts

The perfect brain boosting study snack. Nuts contain high levels of essential fatty acids that increases mental alertness and memory. Nuts also contain high levels of iron, vitamin E and 'good' fats. Go nuts for brazil nuts, almonds, pistachios and walnuts.

Item is currently unrated.What to eat to boost your brain powerPost14/12/2015 11:05 AM29024/03/2016 3:07 PMNatalie MckelvieWhat to eat to boost your brain powerKate Telfer
​Did you know eating certain foods can improve your ability to retain information and concentrate? So why not munch your way to better marks with these brain boosting foods?​​​
Natalie Mckelvie11/03/2016 10:04 AMOpinions0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/Blog/PublishingImages/onlinecommunity.jpg

​​As Chisholm Online students across Victoria and Interstate buckle down for the year’s first study period, 80% are students returning to pursue further online studies. While Chisholm is well reputed for its proven, trusted and results-driven programs, is online learning arming students with additional outcomes beyond a qualification?

General Manager, Theo Teeder, takes a look this evolving learning space and speaks to two teachers to learn what’s driving demand for Chisholm Online courses.

Online learning in education and training isn’t new. In fact, components of e-learning – harnessing the internet to enhance learning beyond the traditional classroom setting – have been around for many years. What’s changed however, is the pace at which technological advances are impacting teaching and learning. New media tools are emerging and gaining popularity rapidly, challenging educators to constantly evaluate their teaching content and delivery styles to effect the best outcomes.

In Meaghan Lister’s paper on the trends of the design of online learning, published in the MERLOT Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, she reports that students with better-designed, more personalised courses have higher engagement and better outcomes.

That’s what we at Chisholm Online take pride in creating for our students.

“Pull” learning Vs “Push” learning

Personalised learning is one of the top buzzwords in education; learner-driven or “Pull” methods of learning as opposed to a typically institution-driven “Push” learning agenda. At Chisholm Online, students take control of their learning, where they are not just consumers of content but active creators of content, through discussions and collaboration.

Anjali Mahendru who teaches a social media module for the Diploma Early Childhood course says students create their own content about the benefits of social media and post them on their chosen platform such as Pinterest and YouTube where they comment, discuss and support one another. The interaction makes learning interesting, engaging and fun. Such discussions often open up unplanned topics and issues that the community is keen to delve into.

Wayne Lens teaches construction and building. He explains that virtual class time can be engaging, particularly when people are more relaxed without the pressure of having to speak up to be heard. Discussions during webinars are particularly conducive to building rapport among members of the community.

Lens: “Online learning allows students to decide when they learn and how they learn. They can slow their pace to re-read materials, or listen to an audio, watch a video or read Power Point slides to expand on a certain topic. Students who are more comfortable with the traditional classroom setting often choose to watch a class lecture recording and take notes along the way, while those who are more vocal enjoy attending the live teacher facilitated webinars each week. The variety of available learning resources gives them options to leverage on their interest and experience.”

Dynamic content

Online communities are dynamic in nature. It is an active learning environment so there is freshness and variety depending on the interaction at any given moment. As Lens explains, additional supplementary content is often created during the course in response to student feedback on what they need in order to help them better understand certain concepts. Learning is prompt and timely, led by what students want.

Effective engagement

Online tracking and analytics allow teachers to see what resources a student has accessed and how much time has been spent working on a particular assignment. Mahendru says that by checking on the data each week, she is able to reach out to those who may be having difficulty getting started or require encouragement.

Mahendru: “We get to know our students very well through their social media posts, and also through discussions where they share stories and situations at their workplaces. There really isn’t a limit on communication. The channel is always open and topics can be discussed freely.”

New media-savvy

Being on top of new technology is crucial for today’s workforce. Online learning pushes students to explore the rich source of multimedia resources available. Lens and Mahendru agree there is often a remarkable increase in student confidence and expertise to use technology by the end of the course, with most students actively participating in webinars and adeptly navigating a variety of online tools and media.

The X Factors

A powerful online learning community thrives on enjoyment, motivation and contribution, where individuals are able to teach and learn from one another. They are also empowered by clear guidelines on learning expectations, and familiarity with resources through orientation and support. At Chisholm Online, we know what nurtures excellent results. Our classes remain small to ensure optimal learning; teachers facilitate webinars and engage with students daily; supported by a student engagement team that students can reach out for help seven days a week. The focus is on our students, in enriching their learning experience and their learning content to achieve job outcomes.

Find out more about Chisholm Online and our online courses.


 

Item is currently unrated.The powerful online communityPost11/03/2016 10:12 AM35011/03/2016 11:37 AMNatalie MckelvieThe powerful online communityTheo Teeder, GM Chisholm Online
Online learning in education and training isn’t new. In fact, components of e-learning – harnessing the internet to enhance learning beyond the traditional classroom setting – have been around for many years. What’s changed however, is the pace at which technological advances are impacting teaching and learning.
Natalie Mckelvie2/03/2016 1:59 PMOpinions0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/SiteCollectionImages/email/banner-sonia.jpg

​​Sonia’s passion for team sports and coaching led her to pursue a career in education. Now she’s landed a full-time role at the childcare centre where she did her work placement.

 An active 19 year old, Sonia spent her teens training at the Rowville Sports Academy in the basketball program. Her love of team sports and coaching led her to a career helping children with their personal development.

“Watching them grow and to be part of their development is such a rewarding thing for me,” says Sonia.

Studying online for her Diploma of Early Childhood Education and Care through Chisholm Online has given Sonia the flexibility to fit study around her work, social and sport commitments.

“Online study suits me as I want to be able to work. Being flexible means you can go online any time you wish to complete your work, plus being online, the content is always there so whenever you need to look back at something, you can.”

A work placement is a mandatory component of her diploma.  Sonia sourced her own placement – and ended up with a full-time job, doing what she loves.

“I am a hands-on learner so doing work placement was great because it’s where I learn best; seeing other educators doing different things was also a great way for me to learn new things too.

“All the staff were so helpful and always willing to give me a hand whenever I needed it – they were very approachable and made me feel really comfortable.

“The course has been really in-depth so I have learnt a lot of different things I now apply in my current role, such as dealing with children’s different emotions.”

Sonia’s advice for anyone looking for work placement? “It pays to look around first at different centres before you ask for placement to see which centre you would feel most comfortable in. And it’s better to visit the centre to try to get a placement rather than ringing or emailing them.”

For advice on securing a work placement, contact Anne Kermeen, Chisholm Online’s Work Placement Coordinator on 1300 275 265.  

Item is currently unrated.Work placement leads to a full-time rolePost2/03/2016 11:04 AM3303/03/2016 1:05 PMNatalie MckelvieWork placement leads to a full-time roleSarah Jordan
​​Sonia’s passion for team sports and coaching led her to pursue a career in education. Now she’s landed a full-time role at the childcare centre where she did her work placement.
Natalie Mckelvie2/03/2016 11:13 AMOpinions0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/SiteCollectionImages/email/banner-place.jpg

Chisholm Online’s Work Placement Coordinator Anne Kermeen is a senior member of the Student Engagement team. Having worked with many students to reach their potential, she now focusses her time purely on work placement; making it a streamline process for both the student and the work place. Anne explains her role in more detail here.

What is the purpose of your role? Can you describe what you do?

My role is firstly to ensure that any workplace environment meets WHS standards and is a suitable environment for our students to do their work placement.  I then act as the liason between the student and the workplace to ensure fluid communication and assist both the student and the workplace should any issues arise.
Secondly I play a pastoral role to students. I can assist students with sourcing work placement when a student is having trouble.  I can visit a potential workplace environment and discuss a student’s needs or just talk with students about anything that might be hindering them from completing the placement and look for solutions to help them.

Are students expected to find their own work place placement?  What assistance do you give?

Students are encouraged to find their own work placement. All students are given a student handbook which explains placement and where suitable placement can be found.
However if a student needs help with their work placement, I am the first point of call.  I can assist students seek out a workplace as well as help them liase with the prospective work place/centre too.

How do you help a student throughout their work placement? And what is the level of your involvement?

Once a student has sourced their work placement, I visit the centre prior to the student starting and talk with them about their responsibilities to the student and reinforce the student needs to meet their work placement requirements.  While the engagement team are generally the first point of call for students, I assist students should they have any concerns with their placement or with the workplace/centres who may wish to discuss a student.

What are your top 5 tips for students looking for work placement?

  1. Make sure you have read the activities you need to complete before calling any centre.

  2. Make sure any workplace environment is listed on the National Registers on the ACECQA website (Applicable for Diploma of Early Childhood and Care students only)​.

  3. Be prepared to look outside of your postcode for a centre or workplace.

  4. When you contact a workplace or centre, be organised with all the information you need to cover off so you can reference how many hours you need to do and if you need to complete specific activities.

  5. Be patient. Be prepared to make a good number of calls to gain your placement.

For more information on work placement, contact Anne Kermeen via the Student Engagement Team on 1300 275 265.

Item is currently unrated.​Q & A with Chisholm Online’s Work Placement Coordinator, Anne Kermeen Post2/03/2016 11:12 AM3402/08/2016 10:33 AMKate Telfer​Q & A with Chisholm Online’s Work Placement Coordinator, Anne Kermeen Sarah Jordan
Chisholm Online’s Work Placement Coordinator Anne Kermeen is a senior member of the Student Engagement team. Having worked with many students to reach their potential, she now focusses her time purely on work placement; making it a streamline process for both the student and the work place. Anne explains her role in more detail here.
Kate Telfer16/02/2016 10:00 AMOpinions0Linda with logo

Chisholm Online Early Childhood Education and Care teacher and course content writer, Linda Skrgatic, has an incredible passion for early childhood education. She brings with her 20 years of experience in the industry a​​nd holistic vision for the education of our future generation.

What led you to teaching and writing Early Childhood Education course material?

I've always had excellent rapport with children so I started working in early childhood centres – I felt it called me. I then moved into more managerial roles in early childhood centres and I became surprised at the lack of knowledge and skills in some of the staff.

I really wanted to make a difference to children's lives and I could see that by educating adults, I could train the educators to be the best they can be. I realised there was only so much I can do to help individual kids, but by getting to the core and shaping the way educators teach children, the difference I could make is limitless.​

What do you currently do with Chisholm Online?

I currently write course content for Chisholm Online's Diploma of Early Childhood Education and Care, write assessments and occasionally teach the subject. I work from my home in New South Wales alongside my little work mascots, two gorgeous Pomeranians. While I enjoy all aspects of my job, the content writing is my passion as it enables me to channel my holistic vision of industry and share it with others.

It's clear to see you have a passion for the subject. Tell us what you believe are the most important teachings educators can deliver to children.​​

The first five years of childhood are so crucial for shaping who a person becomes, so it's important that we teach young children to respect others, respect the environment and to be culturally competent during this time. Children are our future and given the changing nature of the world, I stress to our educators the importance of teaching our children new ways to think and behave in this world, resilience and adaptability.

Tell us about some of the things Chisholm Online students are learning through the Diploma of Early Childhood Education and Care​.

Students are learning how to be mindful educators with a focus on reflective practice through forum discussions and assessment tasks. The course gives a deeper understanding of child development and learning processes and gives students the skills to design and implement early learning curriculums. The Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) and National Quality Framework (NQF) are discussed throughout the course giving students a well rounded understanding on how the framework fits together across all aspects of a service.

What are the best aspects of the course or the delivery?

The best aspect of studying the Diploma with Chisholm Online is that students have the opportunity to be self-learners whilst still being engaged in an interactive learning environment through forums, live question and answer sessions and webinars. The course also offers many interesting documentaries and reading materials along the way that students will find beneficial throughout their practice. There is a Pinterest assessment that runs through the course which offers an exciting way for students to collect and share resources with each other. As well as experienced, friendly and supportive teachers who are willing to support students the whole way throughout their studies. I believe the delivery of the Diploma through Chisholm is of the highest standard in adult education. 

Item is currently unrated.5 Minutes with course writer and teacher, Linda Post15/12/2015 11:11 AM30015/12/2015 12:02 PMKate Telfer5 Minutes with course writer and teacher, Linda Kate Telfer
Chisholm Online Early Childhood Education and Care teacher and course content writer, Linda Skrgatic, has an incredible passion for early childhood education. She brings with her 20 years of experience in the industry a​​nd holistic vision for the education of our future generation.
Kate Telfer26/01/2016 9:50 AMOpinions0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/Blog/PublishingImages/Home%20workspace_blog%20size.jpg
As an online student, you will be spending a fair amount of time at your computer. It's important to set your study space up correctly to avoid headaches, muscle strain and to protect your back. The Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) National President, Marcus Dripps, has provided a few simple rules for you to follow.​

1. Place your screen at eye level

Dripps recommends positioning your screen so it is directly in front of you, about an arm's length away, with the top of the screen at eye level. "This ensures your head is in line with your torso so your neck and shoulder muscles are less fatigued. If you're using a laptop, it might be best to get a stand for your monitor," he says.

2. Support your back​

"This is key. Adjusting your chair so your lower back is supported will reduce strain on your back. Ensure your knees are level with your hips too–this will help to relax your shoulder and neck muscles."

3. Check placement of your elbows, arms and wrists

According to Dripps, placing your keyboard in a position where you can reach it comfortably and at a height where your wrists and forearms are straight and level with the floor is imperative. "Your elbows should be by the side of your body so the arm forms an L-shape at the elbow joint. This will help prevent repetitive strain injuries," he says.

4. Refine your keyboard location

"Be sure your keyboard is directly in front of you when typing, leaving a gap of about 100–150mm at the front of the desk to rest your wrists between tasks. Keep in mind, your wrists should be straight when using a keyboard."  

5. Keep your mouse close

Dripps says a simple tip is to keep your mouse and the keyboard close to you–this will help avoid strain and support your arm on the desk when using the mouse. "A mouse mat with a wrist pad can also help keep your wrist straight and avoid awkward bending."

6. ​​Rest your feet on the floor

Both of your feet should be comfortable, either flat on the floor or supported by a footrest. He strongly recommends not crossing your legs as it could result in bad posture with resultant harmful effects' on the back, hip and pelvis.

7. Take a break

"Finally and importantly, take regular breaks every hour to stretch your legs, drink plenty of water and remember to regularly do some simple neck and back stretches," Dripps concludes. ​

Item is currently unrated.How to protect your back while studying onlinePost14/12/2015 10:02 AM28014/12/2015 10:08 AMKate TelferHow to protect your back while studying onlineKate Telfer
​As an online student, you will be spending a fair amount of time at your computer. It's important to set your study space up correctly to avoid headaches, muscle strain and to protect your back. The Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) National President, Marcus Dripps, has provided a few simple rules for you to follow.​
Natalie Mckelvie21/01/2016 11:50 AMIdeas0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/Blog/PublishingImages/Plumbing-image.jpg

​​“You absolutely can, with Chisholm Institute’s Certificate IV in Plumbing and Services,” says Chisholm Online Plumbing teacher, Cam Gleeson.

“Our new plumbing certificate is specifically designed for certified plumbers to prepare for the Victorian Building Authority licensing exam.”

“We’re taking the lead in providing greater access and flexibility for those who can’t or prefer not to physically attend classes.”

But how do you teach the practical aspects of plumbing?

The online Certificate IV in Plumbing and Services is a theory-based course, only available to those who have completed a Certificate lll in Plumbing which teaches the practical aspects of installation and commissioning components. That means you must already be certified to work as a plumber or gasfitter.

How does the course work?

You’ll need to complete four modules of study, of which three are mandatory.  These include occupational health and safety; work planning that covers risk control, estimating and legal requirements; and managing a business. For the final module, you can choose from five areas of expertise: water, sanitary, drainage, mechanical services, gas fitting or roofing.

When you’ve been accepted into the program, we’ll provide you with a login to access your course materials which come in a variety of media and multimedia formats such as text, audio, video, graphics and Power Point slides. Interactive activities and quizzes have also been designed at the end of each section to help you recap what you’ve learnt. These online activities provide answers and explanations if you get them wrong, and also point you back to where you can review your learning. There is also an optional final practice exam after you complete the Certificate IV course. This Chisholm Institute practice exam is greatpreparation for your licensing exams that are managed and facilitated by VBA, the government industry regulator.

What if I get stuck and need help?

Similar to the traditional classroom setting where students interact and collaborate with other students, you’ll be able to use the online blackboard learning environment to ask questions, discuss and share opinions during weekly webinars. In this part of the course you can also email our experienced plumbing teachers or set up online face-to-face consultation times.

“Our rich teaching techniques, industry expertise and wide range of multimedia resources will provide you with the answers you need and help you learn at your own pace,” said Gleeson. “Don’t forget we were once in your shoes too!”

Why study Certificate IV Plumbing and Services?

While Certificate III enables you to be employed as a plumber or gasfitter, your work must always be supervised by a licensed plumber. Certificate IV, on the other hand, prepares you for the VBA licensing exam, allowing you to take your career to a higher level.
Gleeson: “If you’re interested in working autonomously or running your own business but have been stopped because of the difficulty of physically getting to classes, the new online Certificate IV is a great opportunity to help you advance your career remotely.” 
More about Certificate IV Plumbing and Services
More about VBA licensing requirements

 

Item is currently unrated.How do you study plumbing online?Post21/01/2016 11:53 AM32024/03/2016 3:08 PMNatalie MckelvieHow do you study plumbing online?Kate Telfer
​​“You absolutely can, with Chisholm Institute’s Certificate IV in Plumbing and Services,” says Chisholm Online Plumbing teacher, Cam Gleeson.
Kate Telfer4/01/2016 12:11 PMIdeas0Resume with logo

​Do:

  • Keep your resume to a maximum of two pages long.

  • Place your recent positions and qualifications first.

  • Ensure your spelling and grammar is correct.

  • Ask a friend to proof read it.

  • Include a customised cover letter within which you have answered each of the employer's job selection criteria with how your skills, experience and personality make you a good match for the role.

  • Use bullet points. Keep it short and simple, remembering the reader will often skim over your resume rather than read it in detail. The more concise and clear you are in your wording, the more likely your resume will be held onto and taken to the next stage.

  • Include only information, courses and experience relevant to the job you're applying for.

  • Sell yourself by rephrasing your job responsibilities as achievements. It can be challenging to think of your work tasks as achievements, but often a friend or colleague with a different perspective can help you do this.

Don't

  • Do not provide referee contact details, instead write "Referees available upon request".

  • Do not include details about your nationality, religion, marital status, age.

  • Do not use an unprofessional email address. If you are still using your childhood email account (such as superstar34@...), consider creating a new one using your full name.

 

Item is currently unrated.Resume 101 - Get ahead of the crowd with a standout resumePost8/12/2015 12:16 PM27015/12/2015 11:24 AMKate TelferResume 101 - Get ahead of the crowd with a standout resumeKate Telfer
- Keep your resume to a maximum of two pages long.
- Place your recent positions and qualifications first.
- Ensure your spelling and grammar is correct.
- Ask a friend to proof read it.
Kate Telfer15/12/2015 11:58 AMOpinions0Good relationships
7

​In our working life most of us know a good relationship with colleagues, suppliers and clients is a good thing. It can be the difference in being great and just being OK– whether this is company performance, winning a contract or just enjoying the work we do. The same goes for most of our relationships through life – relationships with our teachers, friends and family.

Most of us also know that one of the most powerful drivers of behaviour in the world of social media is the need for affirmation when we are doing well or commiserations when things are harder. Then there are life events, world events and everything else in between that get shared and commented on- felfies being a new example!

For an education company, the trend here is a compelling one: we have good relationships with our students, our partners and with each other. We also structure our courses so that they make use of social interactions between students and truly embrace the notion of teacher as lead-facilitator. This is a good start and the challenge now is two-fold:

  1. How do we build better informed networks and

  2. What is the best way for our students to access this information?

The first challenge is the easier one to focus on – it is what we are doing now and includes using smartphone / App technology to connect in with communities of experts and practitioners in an easy and unobtrusive way. It is also about making the links between the student communication tools and the virtual classroom as easy as possible to access and use.

The second challenge is harder because everyone has their own communication and learning style preferences. This is why we engage with prospective students to understand how they want to be communicated with as much as what they are looking for. In a world where most are time poor, we think this effort will result in a richer conversation with students and this too is a good thing.

For Chisholm Online, studying online is about the effort and reward as much as any other type of study is – the difference is that we can go that extra yard both because our students deserve it and also because we are helping them to achieve. The fact that they will then recommend us to their own network of friends, family and colleagues is proof that we are doing this well and will be to the long term benefit of all those we connect with.

Item is currently unrated.The importance of good relationships Post15/12/2015 11:59 AM31024/03/2016 3:07 PMNatalie MckelvieThe importance of good relationships Theo Teeder
​In our working life most of us know a good relationship with colleagues, suppliers and clients is a good thing. It can be the difference in being great and just being OK– whether this is company performance, winning a contract or just enjoying the work we do. The same goes for most of our relationships through life – relationships with our teachers, friends and family.
Kate Telfer24/11/2015 10:11 AMIdeas0Free WiFi

​Need to get out of the house to study? We’ve found 9 study friendly areas with free WiFi around Dandenong.


Chisholm Institute (Stud Road)

121 Stud Road, Dandenong

Free WiFi and computer access is available in the Library for all Chisholm Online students. Simply login with your student ID number.


Dandenong Library 

225 Lonsdale St, Dandenong 

Wifi access is available at the Dandenong library for members. Membership is free and open to everyone, so simply ask the staff on the desk how to join up. You may connect with your own laptop or ipad. Alternatively they have computers or ipads available for you to use within the library.


Springvale Library 

411 Springvale Rd, Springvale 

Computers, iPads and WiFi are also available at the Springvale Library. Similarly to the Dandenong Library, you will need to join up first, however membership is free and open to everyone. 


The Pancake Parlour 

159 Princess Highway, Dandenong 

Grab yourself a bottomless filtered coffee mug for the perfect study stimulant. 


McDonalds, Dandenong  

40-44 Princes Hwy, Dandenong 

Grab a burger, a drink and get comfortable in a quiet corner. 


McDonalds, Noble Park

Princess Hwy & Elonera Rd, Noble Park

Conveniently located on a busy corner, get yourself a snack, plug in your headphones and study away. 


Keypoint Cafe​

52 Cambria Rd, Keysborough ​

This popular café has a nice assortment of food and drinks available. Choose from pasta, salad, specials and sweet treats while you study.


Liberica Coffee

225 Lonsdale St, Dandenong 

Liberica Coffee is a unique cafe where customers can relax, socialise and study in an artistic and comfortable environment. With brewed coffee, sandwiches, focaccias, pastries, macaroons and cakes available, you’ll be spoilt for choice.


Addictions Café and Restaurant 

222 Thomas St, Dandenong 

Addictions Café offers a wide selection of Afghani food as well as a sizeable Western menu. Normal trading hours are Monday to Friday 8am-3pm. 


Item is currently unrated.FREE WiFi in DandenongPost20/11/2015 2:29 PM25020/11/2015 3:33 PMKate TelferFREE WiFi in DandenongKate Telfer
​Need to get out of the house to study? We’ve found 9 study friendly areas with free WiFi around Dandenong.
Kate Telfer24/11/2015 10:00 AMIdeas0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/Blog/PublishingImages/Studying%20in%20summer_resized.jpg

​Summer has arrived and we all want to embrace the nice weather and get outdoors. Studying online doesn’t mean you need to lock yourself inside and miss out on the nice days. Here are our top strategies for how to embrace the weather without letting your studies slip.


1. Study early in the morning

This could mean setting your alarm an hour earlier and studying before you start your day or simply prioritising your morning time to focus on your course work. Getting your work done in the morning means you’ll have the rest of the day free to enjoy without having a guilty feeling hanging over you all day. 


2. Go somewhere cool

When the temperature is higher it’s harder for our brains to focus. So if you’re struggling to study in the hot weather, don’t blame yourself. Try to get your body temperature down by studying in an air-conditioned room. If you don’t have air-conditioning at home, try studying somewhere that does. Office builders are notorious for being cool on hot days, so if you work in an office can you study before work, after work or during your lunch break? Alternatively visit the public library or contact our Engagement Team for information on how to visit one of the Chisholm Institute campus libraries. 


3. Do both

If the weather isn’t too hot, mix up studying outside and inside. Try sitting outside and doing some of your coursework for 10-15 minutes, then head inside to finish the rest. Readings, webinars and podcasts are all activities that can be done in the outdoors. 


4. Multitask

Think of ways you can incorporate studying into your everyday activities. Can you listen to podcasts in the car on the way to work, do your readings during your lunchbreak, watch a webinar while waiting in your parked car or while on public transport?


5. Give yourself balance

Spring is all about getting outdoors and being active. If you’ve locked yourself away in a room to study, you’ll feel down and won’t be productive. Set yourself goals of bite sized chunks of study to do each day and reward yourself when you accomplish these tasks by enjoying the rest of the day with family and friends. ​

Item is currently unrated.How to study when you’d rather be outsidePost20/11/2015 2:31 PM2601/12/2015 9:36 AMKate TelferHow to study when you’d rather be outsideKate Telfer
​Summer has arrived and we all want to embrace the nice weather and get outdoors. Studying online doesn’t mean you need to lock yourself inside and miss out on the nice days. Here are our top strategies for embracing the nice weather without letting your studies slip.
Kate Telfer20/11/2015 11:31 AMOpinions0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/Blog/PublishingImages/VET%20qualification.jpg
2

​Many of us were faced with the decision of what to do after finishing high school, some of us before we even finished. I’m not sure about you, but I was expecting to go to university and launch my career from there. I gave it a try, but decided it wasn’t for me at the time and instead finished my first qualification at TAFE.​

The reason I say this is because so many of us think that university is necessary for us to begin a career, but for me, it didn’t work out that way. My VET qualification was structured, it was practical and it gave me a real insight as to what I was going to actually do when I started my first job. ​​

Since this time, I have had a couple of career pathway changes and developments which led me to working within the VET industry myself. I have been in the industry for more than 11 years and currently work as an Assessment Specialist for Chisholm Online​. From my experiences in both studying VET qualifications and working in the industry, I know and understand the many reasons why a VET qualification is so valuable to those wanting to enter the workforce and get the job of their dreams. 

Firstly, all VET qualifications are developed and endorsed by industry. The relevant industry decides what you need to learn to be able to do the job. Employees then recognise VET qualifications as a guarantee that a graduate knows what they are doing. 

Secondly, all VET qualifications teach you the same thing, no matter where you do it or whether it is delivered online, face to face or blended. This is because the training organisations must be registered in order to deliver these qualifications and are regularly audited to ensure they maintain a level of quality and retain their registration. ​

The standards that our qualifications must meet require a collection of knowledge and performance evidence to be demonstrated by a student in order for the student to be foun​​​d competent and gain the qualification. This means that you get the experience of doing the job before you enter the workforce. Some of our Chisholm Online ​students, in certain courses where work placements are mandatory, are offered jobs during their work placements as their supervisors are so impressed with the practical skills and knowledge they acquire through the course. 

In addition to this, your trainers must either be currently working or have recently worked in the industry and their industry knowledge must be current – just another reason why the training you receive will have you job ready. At Chisholm Online, we only employ the best teachers with relevant industry experience to share with their students. For example, Linda Skrgatic is one of our Diploma of Early Childhood Education & Care​ teachers who brings with her 20 years of industry experience as a ch​ild educator and a centre manager.

When you gain a VET qualification, it will be recognised nationally across all other registered training organisations, which means you can apply for credits for the units you have completed when you decide you want to extend your learning. 

For me, it was a simple choice, I knew that a VET qualification would be of value to me, as it meant my employer would know that I could do the job. So when you start thinking about how you are going to advance your career, think about what a VET qualification has to offer you. 

For more information, have a look at the Chisholm Online VET courses available in Business​, Health, Education and Construction.  ​


Item is currently unrated.The true value of a VET QualificationPost20/11/2015 11:50 AM24015/12/2015 12:00 PMKate TelferThe true value of a VET QualificationSarah Phillips
​Many of us were faced with the decision of what to do after finishing high school, some of us before we even finished. I’m not sure about you, but I was expecting to go to university and launch my career from there. I gave it a try, but decided it wasn’t for me at the time and instead finished my first qualification at TAFE.
Kate Telfer10/11/2015 1:42 PMIdeas0Creative ways to remember your goal every day

​In 6 months from now, what is it that you will wish you had started today? For Chisholm Online students who are now halfway through the study period, it may be to catch up coursework in order to successfully complete their study modules. For others it may be start a business, save money, find a new place to live or start a craft project. Whatever your goal is, write it down and use some of these strategies below to make sure you keep it at the forefront of your mind each day. By thinking about your goal each day, you'll naturally make an effort to take the steps to achieve it. You'll thank yourself later!​


1. Write it on the mirror in whiteboard marker, read it w​​hile you brush your teeth.

2. Make it a screen saver on your computer or phone (using words or ev​​en an image to represent the goal).

3. Write it on a piece of paper and stick it up inside your wardrobe so you can see it when getting dressed each morning.

4. Set alarm reminders on your phone to keep you on track.

5. Write or draw your goal on a Post-It note and stick it on your steering wheel.

6. Ask a friend, family member or teacher to remind and encourage you.

7. Take notes of your progress and tick each step off as you take it. You'll feel good knowing you're progressing in the right direction to achieving your goal. 

8. Use the association method where you mentally link everyday things with your goal.

9. Create a mood board with magazine clippings of images that relate to your goal.​

10. Fill a digital photo frame with images or quotes that make you think of your goal. ​​​


Item is currently unrated.Creative ways to remember your goal every dayPost10/11/2015 1:42 PM19012/11/2015 12:47 PMKate TelferCreative ways to remember your goal every dayKate Telfer
In 6 months from now, what is it that you will wish you had started today? For Chisholm Online students who are now halfway through the study period, it may be to catch up coursework in order to successfully complete their study modules. For others it may be start a business, save money, find a new place to live or start a craft project. Whatever your goal is, write it down and use some of these strategies below to make sure you keep it at the forefront of your mind each day. By thinking about your goal each day, you'll naturally make an effort to take the steps to achieve it. You'll thank yourself later!
Kate Telfer26/10/2015 11:22 AMIdeas0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/Blog/PublishingImages/Blog%20size_w%20logo.jpg

​Our Student Engagement Team have found that the students who stay on track within the first weeks of the study period are far more likely to make it through the study period. As it's now week 4, our engagement team have put together their top tips for getting back on track. 

 

1. Make a to-do list 

2. Refer to your training plan and create a study calendar with dedicated study and break periods across the weekend.

3. Reschedule other commitments that will get in the way of your catch up and learn to say 'no'.

4. Communicate to your friends and family that this is a study weekend and ask for their support/help.

5. If you are working this weekend, consider study during your lunch breaks and in your travel time.

6. Turn off your phone or go on a social media detox – it's time to stay focused on your studies!


Item is currently unrated.Top tips for getting back on trackPost26/10/2015 11:28 AM18026/10/2015 11:35 AMKate TelferTop tips for getting back on trackKate Telfer
​Our student engagement team have found that the students who stay on track within the first weeks of the study period are far more likely to make it through the study period. As it's now week 4, our engagement team have put together their top tips for getting back on track.
Kate Telfer19/10/2015 11:47 AMIdeas0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/Blog/PublishingImages/image%20purple_resized.jpg

​Incorrect grammar can make even the best assessment piece look sloppy. With assessment week approaching, we’ve asked our Chisholm Online teachers for the most commonly made grammar mistakes, along with some tricks you can use to avoid them. 


1. Their, they’re and there

For some people the difference in these words is obvious, however many people struggle to remember the grammar rules. Mixing up these words is one of the most common mistakes teachers see occurring in assessment pieces, so it’s an important one to get your head around. 

  • Use “there” when referring to a​​ place or location. For example: “I am going there.”
  • Use “their” to indicate possession. For example: “I’m going inside their house.”
  • Use “they’re” when you mean “they are”. For example: “They’re behaving well.” 


2. Your and you’re

Similarly to the above rules, the position and inclusion of the apostrophe is important.

  • “You’re” is used when you want to say “you are”. For example: “You’re studying hard.”
  • “Your” is used when you are referring to something that belongs to someone. For example: “Is this your backpack?”


3. Than and then

These two words have very different meanings, however they are often used incorrectly. 

  • “Than” is used when making a comparison between things. For example: “My computer is older than this one”.
  • “Then” is used when referring to time. For example: “I’ll finishing this, then I’ll start the next task”.


4. Capital letters

Capital letters are often over used for emphasis on particular words people think are important or relevant to what they’re trying to say. Here are the basic rules of when to use capital letters:

  • At the start of a sentence “I saw a dog walking.” Instead of “i saw a dog walking”.
  • Proper nouns (for example the name of a person, company, city or month). 
  • Within the title of an assessment piece, essay, blog, book etc. 


5. Abbreviations 

It’s likely you will use abbreviations within your assessment piece, however never just assume the reader knows what the abbreviation stands for. It’s important to write out the full name of a company, institution, government body, authority or code when you first refer to them. For example you would write “The Building Code of Australia (BCA)”, then you may use the short form “BCA” throughout the rest of the piece of writing. 


6. Alot or a lot

Thankfully spellcheck often catches this mistake, however it’s a slip-up teachers still see popping up in assessments. Always remember there should be a space in “a lot” when referring to a large quantity of something.


7. Use paragraphs 

No teacher wants to see a huge block of text that hasn’t been broken up into paragraphs. Your assessment piece should consist of paragraphs of at least three to four sentences and no more than five or six. Start a new paragraph for each new idea or point you want to make and make sure each sentence within the paragraph relates to that same idea or point. 


Item is currently unrated.7 grammar mistakes you don’t want to makePost19/10/2015 12:17 PM16020/11/2015 1:25 PMKate Telfer7 grammar mistakes you don’t want to makeKate Telfer
​Incorrect grammar can make even the best assessment piece look sloppy. With assessment week approaching, we’ve asked our Chisholm Online teachers for the most commonly made grammar mistakes, along with some tricks you can use to avoid them.
Kate Telfer15/10/2015 11:53 AMOpinions0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/Blog/PublishingImages/Blog_future%20of%20education.jpg
3

Education has often been commented on as being a sector ripe for disruption with emergent technologies and the pace of change. To some extent this is true, but this is more a result of changing behaviours in consumers rather than in education itself. Take the development of educational apps and digital content for example, which have been driven primarily by the software available and used regularly by consumers. This is actually a good thing. It’s good because it means that the orientation and ‘learning curve’ of consumers in an educational context is short. It’s good in as much as budgets can be better expended on addressing learning requirements and working with mass –adoption to achieve efficiency of scale. It is also good in that educators can focus on the core: namely, the development of knowledge, skills and understanding to students (in other words learning!). 

So, where does the world of online learning in its current form sit and how will it likely adapt over the coming 5-plus years? 


Really good online content makes use of certain key characteristics that are a mix of both mode of delivery and human behaviour. As learners, we like the flexibility of accessing learning on demand. We are also social animals and a good online experience should have the social context at its heart. Likewise, we are on a trend of becoming more time-poor, so we want to ensure that when we are investing personal capital the experience is engaging, outcomes based and delivers what it promises. 


From a technology perspective this translates itself into a formal and non-formal education market based on demand. Formal being the domain of K – 12 and tertiary education making use of the flipped class model and being acutely aware of the responsibilities that the collection of personal data / big data brings to an organisation. 


At a less formal level, the market trend appears to be heading into a quasi-TED talks / Amazon purchasing model that will have content available in a digital marketplace. This content will most likely have some degree of curation and also be weighted according to popularity / relevance of search. This could range from anything such as an introduction to social marketing through to how to change a car tyre and everything else in between! 


For a vocationally focussed online education business like Chisholm Online, our challenge is to be relevant to both the formal and the informal.  Some of the larger international institutions are experimenting with similar situations with collaborative MOOCs offered in tandem with more formal qualifications and this too is an interesting model. 


The trick will be to marry the efficiency of scale that online technologies bring with the human desire for an individualised experience and the need to be part of a (relevant) social network. Perhaps the saying ‘art imitates life’ into the future will read ‘education imitates life’ and this will be where the real relevance lies. 


Item is currently unrated.The future of education – flexible, on demand and relevant Post15/10/2015 11:55 AM15015/12/2015 12:01 PMKate TelferThe future of education – flexible, on demand and relevant Theo Teeder
Education has often been commented on as being a sector ripe for disruption with emergent technologies and the pace of change. To some extent this is true, but this is more a result of changing behaviours in consumers rather than in education itself...
Kate Telfer9/10/2015 2:26 PMIdeas0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/About-Us/PublishingImages/Life%20coach%20image_new%20size.jpg

Have you ever wondered how some people kick goal after goal and achieve their dreams, while the rest of us spend our time focusing on mundane tasks like paying rent and contemplating what to cook for dinner? Life coach, Kerry Blake, explains how we too can set ourselves up on a path to success and live the life we want.​

Baby steps are key

Most life coaches will agree that the key to achieving your goal it to take small steps towards it. "Having a dream or a goal is a little bit like standing in front of a l​​​arge elephant and being told to eat the elephant with a teaspoon. You look at the huge elephant in front of you and think that it's just not possible," says Kerry.  However, by breaking the elephant up into small 'bite-sized' pieces, over time, this is definitely a manageable task. "In doing this, you will find your efforts become focused on one area, then another area, rather than doing a whole lot of random things that have no particular end in mind." Kerry explains.

Model behaviour

It's much easier to emulate and adopt the things we like in others when we have someone to look up to, so find a role model. This could be someone you work with, a friend's parent or someone you don't know but look up to, say Richard Branson or Anita Roddick, the founder of The Body Shop. Kerry adds, "Ideally, a mentor will be someone who you admire both professionally and personally. This person's values, ethics and standards should align with your own. You should then focus on evaluating their values, as well as looking at ways in which they live their lives and behaviours you can model."

Staying focused

"The best thing to do in order to stay on track is make sure your goals are simple, achievable and realistic for you," Kerry advises. If you are wearing a few different hats, for example you have children, work full-time and study part-time, your goals need to be realistic. Writing down your goals is always helpful, consider using erasable marker pens so you can write your mini goals, baby steps or inspirational quotes on the microwave, fridge or bathroom mirror. Daily or weekly lists are a great way of managing your time effectively in that you can tick off both general tasks as well as small achievements that work towards your goal. ​

Are people laughing at your goals?

Unfortunately it's quite common for peers and family to think your goals are unrealistic and not take them seriously. Kerry says "it's also common for people feel embarrassed about their goals, especially if it takes them out of their own or their family's comfort zone. For example, you may be the first person in your family to gain a qualification or travel overseas". Rise above this by looking for a supportive friend, family member or work colleague who you feel comfortable confiding in. This person can be your sounding board, will offer approval and encouragement, and will tell you that your goals are achievable – because they are!​

Top tips to achieve your goals

Kerry's background is in neurolinguistic programming which involves encouraging people to use positive language and thoughts to shape their future. Her top tips are:

1. Always frame your self-talk in positive terms
"I am intelligent, I have everything I need in order to achieve my goals- I have the strength, I have the intelligence, I have the capability. I am wise enough to do the things that are good for me and right for me and only those things".

2. Keep your goals strong, simple and stated in the present.
For example if you are undertaking an online course, you know that you are working towards a promotion or a new job in the long term, but make sure you state your goals in the present, such as 'I have everything I need to excel in these modules so that I can take another step towards a fantastic job that's waiting for me."

3. Your goals should never rely on other people.
For example, your goal mustn't be something like "I'm going for an interview and they will all love me". What is a better way to phrase this to yourself is, "I'm excited to be going for this interview today and I know that I'll perform to my absolute best and I will do a wonderful job. I will speak up with pride and certainty for myself and I am fully prepared to be my best".

4. Remember to smile.
Smiling makes you feel better. They're also infectious and make people around you feel happier. ​

 

Kerry Blake is a professional life coach, specialising in neurolinguistic programing. She has worked with a variety of clients from all different backgrounds to help them carve out a plan to live the life they want.

 

 ​

Item is currently unrated.A life coach’s guide to achieving your dreams Post9/10/2015 2:33 PM14015/12/2015 12:01 PMKate TelferA life coach’s guide to achieving your dreams Kate Telfer
Have you ever wondered how some people kick goal after goal and achieve their dreams, while the rest of us spend our time focusing on mundane tasks like paying rent and contemplating what to cook for dinner? Life coach, Kerry Blake, explains how we too can set ourselves up on a path to success and live the life we want.
Kate Telfer14/09/2015 12:13 PMIdeas0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/PublishingImages/Success%20pipeline_new%20size.jpg

​Some of you will have seen the media release Help Us Shape The Education State that came out of the Premier of Victoria’s office in July.  Contained within this release was a really important sentence that spoke to the core of what is at stake here:​

“The dedication of our teachers, principals, parents, carers and students makes our education system strong.  But with the accelerating pace of change in our economy, we need to think differently.”* 

Thinking differently is important and is what we have done when looking at the role Chisholm Online can provide in making a difference to students and to the wider economic benefit of Victoria. This is why we have concentrated efforts, in the past few months, on building the learning resources and education support systems to launch new qualifications in Certificate IV Plumbing and Services and Certificate IV TAE (Training and Assessment). 

The Certificate IV Plumbing and Services is for those who already hold the relevant plumbing apprenticeship qualification and want to go on and run their own business. This is strongly aligned with our focus of tapping into the entrepreneurial spirit of small business and allowing these entrepreneurial spirits a creditable and flexible path to achieving their outcomes. 

In a similar manner the Certificate IV Training and Assessment is about those with the skills and professional experience using their talents to the betterment of students by becoming qualified to teach and assess in the VET sector. It is our belief that those who can, teach and those with relevant knowledge and skills can undertake this qualification to bring their expertise to a new generation of students. A new generation of students who need to be educated and prepared to work in an economy experiencing significant and on-going change. 

For Chisholm Online our part in helping to shape the Education State continues and whilst we expect some challenges the message is a clear one: relevant online courses backed by good educational management and aligned to industry and economic needs is a good bet for both Victoria and Australia. 

Chisholm Online offers 17 courses across business, construction, health and education. Visit our website for more information.​


* Help Us Shape The Education State, Wednesday 10 June 2015​

Item is currently unrated.Accelerating the Education StatePost14/09/2015 12:34 PM13019/10/2015 12:20 PMKate TelferAccelerating the Education StateTheo Teeder
Accelerating the Education State

​Some of you will have seen the media release Help Us Shape The Education State that came out of the Premier of Victoria’s office in July.  Contained within this release was a really important sentence that spoke to the core of what is at stake here:​
“The dedication of our teachers, principals, parents, carers and students makes our education system strong.  But with the accelerating pace of change in our economy, we need to think differently.”*...
Kate Telfer7/09/2015 12:20 PMIdeas07 celebrities who studied online

Famous for their acting, directing, singing and sporting abilities, you would never guess that many celebrities also have invested time and money in their education, even after their career successes. These celebrities chose to study online to fit in with their busy schedules. You’ll be surprised at the courses they chose to take, many proving to be both beauty and brains!


Venus Williams

Online bachelor of science (in business administration)

Famous for her fiery attitude and centre court tantrums, professional tennis player Venus Williams made it to world number 1 in 2002.  She is considered to be one of the greatest female tennis players in history. However Venus’ achievements don’t stop at tennis. She wanted to grow her clothing and merchandise business so she studied online and obtained a bachelor of science in business administration. Venus attended the graduation ceremony in August 2015, marking her first visit to the physical campus. She disclosed “it was like family, like it was my school, and I was so excited. It’s been an incredible journey.” ​


Shaquille O’Neal

Online bachelor degree, MBA and PhD (in leadership and education)

Commonly known as ‘Shaq’, this NBA champion basketball player was named one of the 50 greatest players in NBA history. While playing basketball, he studied online obtaining a bachelor degree, followed by an MBA and PhD! Shaq had this to say after achieving his MBA: “Sports for me has always been, you know, fairy tale life. And this right here is real life. This right here means more. It’s just something to have on my resume when I go back to reality. Someday I may have to put down the basketball and get a regular job like everyone else.”​


James Franco

Bachelor degree, MBA and PhD all online (in English and creative writing)

This Hollywood actor has appeared in many movies, notably Pineapple Express, Spider-Man and The Interview. After dropping out of high school in year 10 to peruse his acting career, James enrolled in online education and achieved a bachelor degree. He then attended grad school online majoring in writing and also achieved a PhD in English, literature and creative writing. The actor believes he gained so much from online study that he decided to start teaching online courses in filmmaking at UCLA, USC and Cal Arts.​


Hilary Duff 

Courses through Harvard University’s online extension school (environmental science, government, and sociology).

Best known for her lead role in the Disney television series, Lizzie McGuire, Hilary also stared in many children’s movies and released two albums. Her and her sister took online courses at Harvard University’s extension school, tweeting “the on-line classes are really cool!”​


Steven Spielberg 

Online bachelor degree (film production and electronic arts)

Famous for directing movies such as Jurassic Park, Jaws, Saving Private Ryan, ET, Catch Me If You Can and many more blockbuster hits, Steven Spielberg enrolled in courses to obtain an online bachelor degree in film production and electronic arts in 2002. Even after successfully directing an enviable portfolio of million dollar movies, the award-winning director demonstrated the value he places on education, proving there is always more to learn, even when you reach the top! ​


Marcia Cross

Online masters in psychology 

Most commonly known for her role as Bree Van de Kamp in Desperate Housewives, Marcia also starred in Melrose Place, Seinfeld, Spin City and CSI. During her busy filming schedule, Marcia took online courses to reach her goal of obtaining a Masters in Psychology.​


Arnold Schwarzenegger

Bachelor degree (business and international economics)

Former governor of California and Terminator movie star, Arnold studied hard and acquired a bachelor degree in business and international economics through the University of Wisconsin’s distance learning program. 


Item is currently unrated.7 celebrities who studied onlinePost7/09/2015 12:25 PM1209/10/2015 11:44 AMKate Telfer7 celebrities who studied onlineKate Telfer
Famous for their acting, directing, singing and sporting abilities, you would never guess that many celebrities also have invested time and money in their education, even after their career successes. These celebrities chose to study online to fit in with their busy schedules. You’ll be surprised at the courses they chose to take, many proving to be both beauty and brains!​
Kate Telfer3/09/2015 2:23 PMOpinions0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/PublishingImages/Image%20from%20matty_resized.jpg

​Access to good quality, impactful courses that lead to new or improved opportunities for students is what drives Chisholm Online. This is never more so when reflecting on the barriers that face regional students.

Research shows that the barriers regional students face from moving away from home, separating from friends and family networks to the higher cost of living in metropolitan areas are a significant deterrent to higher education (ACER 2011**).

The above is fairly obvious point but what tends to get forgotten is the impact 'brain-drain' can have on our regional communities.

Students who leave regional areas to study in larger cities are unlikely to return to their hometown, with an average of 74% remaining in cities after graduation. (Hillman and Rothman 2007, referenced in ACER 2011**). 

At Chisholm Online we are very mindful of this, thus our key factors when developing our online courses are: 

  • Pay attention to who the student is. This includes their background, what their aspirations are and what support do they need to get there.

  • Provide students with the opportunity to connect with a teacher and with other students.

  • Use appropriate technologies that are available to us and to the student to deliver a learning program that is interesting, engaging and focussed on defined outcomes.

Above all, connected learning and building courses that encourage collaboration provide the best chance of supporting students in meeting their goals and aspirations. This is important for all students and especially so for regional students who now have the opportunity to access  courses that are  respected by industry and delivered by the Australian and Victorian large training provider of the year.​


** ACER (2011) 'Higher education & community benefits: The role of regional provision', Joining the Dots, Research Briefing, Vol 1, No. 5, September 2011.​

Item is currently unrated.Online and just in time for Regional AustraliaPost3/09/2015 2:38 PM11019/10/2015 12:21 PMKate TelferOnline and just in time for Regional AustraliaKate Telfer
​Access to good quality, impactful courses that lead to new or improved opportunities for students is what drives Chisholm Online. This is never more so when reflecting on the barriers that face regional students.
Research shows that the barriers regional students face from moving away from home, separating from friends and family networks to the higher cost of living in metropolitan areas are a significant deterrent to higher education (ACER 2011**).
Kate Telfer2/09/2015 9:33 AMIdeas0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/PublishingImages/COL_Blog_Louise_Women_new%20size.jpg

Chisholm Online course designer Louise smith has taught many mothers and fathers as a business teacher. Here Louise shares with us her insights and advice for those looking to gain their confidence back and successfully re-enter the job market.


When I was teaching, I could always tell which students were returning to study after staying at home to raise children. They were the ones who sat at the front so they didn’t miss any information and never volunteered answers. They were also the students who made the most of their time in class and were the most resourceful during projects. Mainly women, these students were always anxious that they wouldn’t be clever enough to gain their qualifications and that their parenting commitments would inhibit their study time.

I always tell parents returning to study “yes, you are clever enough, if I can do it anybody can.” I could identify with these students because it had not been too long since I was a parent returning to the workforce myself. I was at home with my four children for 7 years and when I returned to study I remember the self-doubt I had. I felt I wasn’t intelligent enough to complete my assessments and worried about juggling my family responsibilities with study. I remember Googling every word within my first assignment because I couldn’t understand what I was being asked to do. I was afraid of looking foolish in front of the other learners. In time, I began to understand and even enjoy study and I have continued study to today.

The parental trap

When we stay at home with children we never get to a point where we have completed anything. There is always another meal to cook or child to dress. I often relay this to a hamster on a wheel –you feel you are working hard but it’s difficult to see accomplishments.

This cycle erodes the belief in our accomplishments and after many years of this, it’s not surprising that we are apprehensive when it comes to committing to a course. Personally, as a student myself, I always return to my goal of study when this happens. Am I studying for a better job, a higher salary, or a pathway to further study? This goal is in the forefront of my mind when the going gets tough.

Parents do it better

As a teacher, I have seen that parents can often cope with tough times in a learning environment better than other students. The multitasking and organizational skills that are acquired through raising children are second to none. Students who are also parents tend to be highly organised

Mothers and fathers need to remember that while they are staying at home looking after the children, they are also learning valuable skills that can be applied to the workplace and study environment.

Study flexibility

My colleagues and I have a lot of respect for parents returning to study as we know it takes a lot of guts to take this important step after many years at home with a family.

This is why, as a course designer at Chisholm Online, I have added many study tools to enable parents to study while doing other activities. So rather than choosing between cleaning the kitchen and studying, they can do both at the same time. Some of the learning tools that are included within our courses are audio podcasts that can be listened to at any time, recorded webinars and chats so that students can view their tutor teaching when they have the time, and forums for students to be part of an online learning community. We respect the time each student is investing in themselves and want to make their study time worthwhile, so we believe online education should come to them.

For me studying has given me much more than information, it has exposed me a network of like-minded people and the ability to reach goals I didn’t believe were possible. Above all, learning has given me the privilege to educate and encourage women like myself who have given years of their time to their family, to finally give to themselves. Because it really is their time.


About Louise

Louise Smith is a senior Instructional Designer at Chisholm Online, specializing in Education. She has recently completed post graduate studies in Digital Education and is a single mother raising four gorgeous girls.​

Item is currently unrated.The Juggling GamePost2/09/2015 9:36 AM1009/10/2015 11:44 AMKate TelferThe Juggling GameLouise Smith
Chisholm Online course designer Louise smith has taught many mothers and fathers as a business teacher. Here Louise shares with us her insights and advice for those looking to gain their confidence back and successfully re-enter the job market.
Kate Telfer24/08/2015 3:04 PMIdeas; Opinions0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/Blog/PublishingImages/COL_Blog_Maria_resized.jpg

​​In setting up Chisholm Online, it was really important for Chisholm Institute​ that we established an educationally sound, innovative and engaging delivery option for students who want to progress their study but not necessarily at a campus location. Before launching Chisholm Online the Institute conducted significant research into what an "ideal" educational online w​orld would look like for a prospective student. The overwhelming feedback was the provision of structure and support​. Support being more than just setting up a student contact centre, it had to include access to online teachers who are respected by industry and are as flexible in their delivery as our students are in their study patterns. Structure was also deemed crucial – providing our students with training plans, pre-training support and recognisable mileposts as they progress through their chosen qualification. In other words, online but not alone.  

Chisholm Online meets this and more. It provides significant support and structure as well as pathways for students who are looking​ to move into more advanced areas of study. It provides consistent delivery and all our online students get a Chisholm Institute qualification – a qualification that is recognised and respected by industry from the current Australian and Victorian Large Training Provider of the Year.​

Our online business is still less than a year old and​ is now embarking on its fourth study period. Each period our student numbers grow and these students provide us with great feedback on their experience with us, indicating how we are achieving our aim of improving their career options or getting them back into work. They also tell us how we can improve what we do, which is invaluable.

In a time of change for our sector, Chisholm Online offers another dimension to enable Chisholm Institute to be​ the​​ educational partner of choice for students and other clients.  A strong foundation of support, and a desire to improve the​ outcomes of our students, is at the heart of what we do. As Chief Executive of Chisholm, it is my responsibility to ensure that Chisholm Online holds true to these core values. As we approach the anniversary of the launch of Chisholm Online I am delighted to say that it does.  ​

Item is currently unrated.Why Chisholm Online?Post24/08/2015 3:38 PM9019/10/2015 12:21 PMKate TelferWhy Chisholm Online?​Maria Peters, Chisholm Institute​​​​​ CEO
​​In setting up Chisholm Online, it was really important for Chisholm Institute​ that we established an educationally sound, innovative and engaging delivery option for students who want to progress their study but not necessarily at a campus location.
Kate Telfer18/08/2015 2:00 PMIdeas0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/PublishingImages/Theo%20Blog%20Image%20resized.jpg

​​One of the main questions we get asked by prospective students is whether to start with the Certificate IV or move straight into a Diploma level course. Often the focus is initially on the Diploma courses as these are the higher level qualifications and this is understandable. However, at Chisholm Online we have selected Cert IV qualifications that can have a real impact on where you want to go. Take for example the Cert IV in Small Business Management: this qualification is all about providing students with the skills and knowledge needed in the running of a small business. Students learn about financial planning, marketing their products & services, customer service and building successful teams. Having run a couple of small businesses myself this is exactly​ what should be covered for getting an organization up and running and set up for success.​

So, when looking at courses and training providers make sure that the course that you are enrolled in prepares you for employment in an industry area. That you are learning more about your industry/employment role as well as developing your critical thinking and reasoning, your analysis skills and your writing practice.

Completing your qualification offers you something else too; a clear pathway to further study and higher qualifications. This is where diplomas - in particular - can be a really useful introduction back into study and getting the best return from your investment in you. Chisholm Online offer Diploma into a Bachelor degree programs at Chisholm Institute (on-campus) or at one of our university partners (both on-campus and online). As a successful Diploma student you can expect to get some credit for your Diploma. Generally, you will get up to 8 subjects or one year as credit into the degree, that means that the degree will take you less time to complete. There are pathways like this for all Chisholm Online’s Diploma courses.


Item is currently unrated.Job opportunities & pathways, a marriage made in heaven?Post19/08/2015 2:07 PM809/10/2015 2:39 PMKate TelferJob opportunities & pathways, a marriage made in heaven?Theo Teeder
One of the main questions we get asked by prospective students is whether to start with the Certificate IV or move straight into a Diploma level course. Often the focus is initially on the Diploma courses as these are the higher level qualifications and this is understandable. However, at Chisholm Online we have selected Cert IV qualifications that can have a real impact on where you want to go.
Kate Telfer10/08/2015 9:34 AMOpinions0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/PublishingImages/Belinda_image.jpg

​Belinda Barnes decided to study a Diploma of Work Health and Safety with Chisholm Online to advance her career and further grow within her role as an Occupational Health and Safety Coordinator at a food manufacturing company. She shares her story with us below.​

Before I enrolled in the course, I was already working full time with my current employer as an Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Coordinator within the food manufacturing and agricultural industry. My managers suggested I enrol in a course to expand and grow within the role and also to fulfil some new workplace requirements.

I chose to study with Chisholm Online so I could complete my course without having to give up my fulltime job or adjust my work commitments.  As my company is based in both New South Wales and Victoria, I am required to travel frequently, so the ability to easily study online at any time really important to me.

I chose Chisholm Online because the traditional campus based courses have a great reputation and I felt that they would provide a good learning experience. The flexibility, ease of access and availability of staff was exactly what I was looking for and contributed to my enjoyable experience with Chisholm Online.

I found the course content to be very comprehensive yet displayed in a manner that was easy to understand. Moodle certainly had a good balance of readings, quizzes, videos, links and activities which were much more engaging than standard, traditional lectures.

The teachers were more than helpful and really took the time to help me learn effectively, going above and beyond to help with any questions. I usually reached out to my teacher twice a week, mainly in relation to assessment questions and they responded to me promptly via email or through Moodle.

I particularly enjoyed completing practical assessments where I was able to directly apply the learning content to my current role within my workplace – I could see the benefits of the course immediately.

Studying Work Health and Safety (WHS) with Chisholm Online has helped cement my knowledge of WHS/OHS Legislation and Regulations in both jurisdictions I work in. The course greatly improved my work performance in my current role and definitely has expanded my knowledge in WHS, particularly in comprehensive risk assessment.

The WHS Industry is always evolving and employers now requires candidates to have formal qualifications. As a result of obtaining the diploma, my career prospects have now increased considerably. I will be able to draw on the knowledge obtained during the course and apply it to any of my future roles within the industry.


Item is currently unrated.Meet graduate, BelindaPost10/08/2015 9:58 AM7013/11/2015 9:52 AMKate TelferMeet graduate, Belinda
​Belinda Barnes decided to study a Diploma of Work Health and Safety with Chisholm Online to advance her career and further grow within her role as an Occupational Health and Safety Coordinator at a food manufacturing company. She shares her story with us below...
Kate Telfer4/08/2015 2:46 PMEvents0https://www.chisholmonline.edu.au/Blog/PublishingImages/Week3.jpg

​Most Chisholm Online students will have an assessment piece due this week, so we’ve asked our Chisholm Online teachers for their advice on how to improve assessment scores. See their words of wisdom below.​

1. Take a sneak peek at the assignment early on.

Then take note of what may contribute to the assignment as you go through each week’s learning material, especially the theory and readings.

2. Take lots of notes as you go through each week’s learning material.

These notes may be useful for completing the required tasks within the assignment.

3. Plan for your assessment.

Use time management skills and avoid cramming too much work in at the end. This will make you more relaxed when everyone else is pulling their hair out.

4. Pay particular attention to any theories, methodologies or technical specification required for the assignment.

Then go back and do some extra reading so you develop an in-depth understanding.

5. Sketch a plan or overview of the assessment.

Planning is important and understanding the word-count and structure is key to assessment success. Within your plan, include dot points that articulate the key points of the assessment to make sure you include them in your answer. Remember, someone has to read your assessment, so try to create an easy to read format where important information is obvious to the reader.

6. Re-read the assessment task and make sure you actually answer the question being asked.  

It's easy to digress, so after you've finished your assessment, re-read it a day or so later with fresh eyes and ask yourself whether you've answered the question. Pretend you're your assessor!

7. Make sure you have addressed ALL parts of the question.

You must address all parts of the question asked in order for the teacher to pass the assessment.

8. Basic spell check!

Check your spelling, grammar and presentation before submitting your assignment.

9. Include references.

Avoid plagiarism by referencing when you are using quotes or someone else’s ideas. 

10. Have someone else proofread your work.

Two sets of eyes are better than one. Ask an astute family member or friend to read over your work and give you constructive feedback to improve your assessment.

11.  Submit the assessment a few days prior to the due date.

This provides you with another chance to resubmit the work in case the assessment is not satisfactory in the first attempt.​

12. Read the comment boxes next to your submissions.

This is where your teacher will leave comments and notify you if you are required to resubmit the assessment.


Item is currently unrated.12 ways to improve your online assessment results Post4/08/2015 3:01 PM609/10/2015 11:47 AMKate Telfer12 ways to improve your online assessment results Kate Telfer
​Most Chisholm Online students will have an assessment piece due this week, so we’ve asked our Chisholm Online teachers for their advice on how to improve assessment scores. See their words of wisdom below.​
Raja Ganesan16/07/2015 10:23 AMIdeas1blog graphic

It's not every day that I find myself looking at the treasury website and scanning their myriad of statistics and associated analysis. Today is different though: This February Chisholm Online launch a series of qualifications that looks to support the areas of small business, aspiring business owners and our future entrepreneurs. According to treasury, Small Businesses employed around 4.5 million people in 2012-13, equating to approximately 43 percent of private sector employment. This 43 percent, the same report states, contributes around 33 percent of private industry value added in 2012-13. These are significant numbers!​

For an education business like Chisholm Online we look at this and the immediate challenge is how do we provide support that meets the reality of such a varied workf​orce with differing demands on their time and their life outside of work?

We start to meet this challenge by delivering well designed, practical qualifications that focus on the reality of what a small business needs – e.g. Knowledge and skills to manage the challenges in their existing organisation and to provide the tools so that the business is better placed to grow in the future. This is a first priority. Equally, where established small business are looking to grow again past their establishment phase we want to provide more specialist business support and qualifications. That's why we are also offering courses in Marketing, HR, Accounting and WH&S. All relevant areas for business and backed up by significant tutor support with strong small business experience.

Courses available include Certificate IVs in areas such as Business Management and Marketing as well as Diplomas areas such as Business, Business Management, HR and Accounting.​

Item is currently unrated.Supporting small business through online coursesPost16/07/2015 10:27 AM5015/12/2015 12:01 PMKate TelferSupporting small business through online coursesTheo Teeder
It's not every day that I find myself looking at the treasury website and scanning their myriad of statistics and associated analysis. Today is different though: This February Chisholm Online launch a series of qualifications that looks to support the areas of small business, aspiring business owners and our future entrepreneurs.
Kate Telfer4/03/2015 10:12 AMOpinions0Are you being served?

​One of the advantages of studying online with Chisholm Online is that we have Student Engagement Officers available seven days per week, to ensure that your learning journey with us is as smooth as possible. They can help with course requirements, technical issues, careers or pathways advice and anything else you need!

I recently asked Daniel, our student engagement leader who has had many years experience in customer / student support roles, what were the most memorable moments in his career ..........

" I've worked both in Australia and overseas in customer service roles from answering calls to creating great teams of people. During this time, two calls stick in my mind and remind me that everything else that comes through is a walk in the park.

The first call was in a Pay TV call centre. I took a call from an existing customer who was convinced we were doing two things. Firstly, sending gas through her Set Top Box to poison her. And secondly, monitoring her with a camera and laughing at what she was wearing. Note to everyone reading this, there was no camera in the set top box and she did not have any gas connection. It was a struggle not to laugh, ever the professional.

The second call was for a pay per view boxing match. People had to pay to watch the event via credit card. My customer called a few minutes before the event and I processed his payment so he could view the match.

Unfortunately the boxing match went for under 3 minutes as one of the ears of a competitor was bitten off so it all came to a grinding halt. The phone lines went red hot.

The caller I got was the same person I had a few minutes earlier, saying someone made an un-authorized charge to his credit card and that he wouldn't pay. I reminded him that I had spoken to him minutes. He then said he shouldn't have to pay because the event was so short.

I then had to remind him that during our previous call, I said we could not guarantee the length of the match but that we hoped it would be a good one. His response ’just cancel the whole thing and come and take the stupid set top box’. At this point I heard screaming in the background...."Noooo, dad don't cancel the box, dad, let us keep it, dad, nooooo.” The gentleman said to me, 'Thanks you've been very patient. We'll keep the box, have a great day, bye”​

Fortunately, when it comes to Chisholm Online, the questions we get are a little more focused without the emotion. We deal with all sorts of things when dealing with customer relationships. The most important thing to do is to maintain a good sense of humour, connect with the caller and provide meaningful and practical support.

Item is currently unrated.Hello, how can I help you?Post13/11/2015 10:39 AM20013/11/2015 10:39 AMKate TelferHello, how can I help you?Theo Teeder
​One of the advantages of studying online with Chisholm Online is that we have Student Engagement Officers available seven days per week, to ensure that your learning journey with us is as smooth as possible. They can help with course requirements, technical issues, careers or pathways advice and anything else you need!
Kate Telfer11/01/2015 10:59 AMOpinions0Your education

​There are certain non-negotiables in every sector and in the Vocational sector one of the main non-negotiables is assessment. That is why we at Chisholm Online spend so much time and effort making sure that we get the assessment model and structure right.​​

When a student is considering study in the Vocational sector the biggest difference to what they have perhaps experienced previously is the focus on the outcomes of the learning rather than the curriculum that is being taught. This can be a refreshingly transparent experience if done properly. ‘Done properly’ means assessments are developed to ensure they are compliant with the National Standards and consistent with current industry standards of the qualification. It also means that they are replicable and can be demonstrated consistently over time.

For Chisholm Online this is assured by the development of assessments in line with a rigorous set of policies and procedures. This informs our content design process and also allow the assessments to be replicable, rigorous and fair to the student. We appreciate the importance of a qualification that is reputable and will be sought after by industry, and strive to support our students to be desired within the workplace.

As a sector it is our role to make sure that Industry has confidence in the ability of those who complete a Vocational qualification knowing that the student was assessed on their ability to apply the skills and knowledge. For Chisholm Onlin​e we spend the time and effort making the assessments meet the industry requirements but within the world of an online learner.

So don’t risk your education, study with the best. Australian and Victorian large training provider of the year. 

Item is currently unrated.Don't risk your educationPost13/11/2015 11:06 AM21013/11/2015 11:12 AMKate TelferDon't risk your educationTheo Teeder
​There are certain non-negotiables in every sector and in the Vocational sector one of the main non-negotiables is assessment. That is why we at Chisholm Online spend so much time and effort making sure that we get the assessment model and structure right.​​ When a student is considering study in the Vocational sector the biggest difference to what they have perhaps experienced previously is the focus on the outcomes of the learning rather than the curriculum that is being taught.
Kate Telfer15/12/2014 11:14 AMOpinions0Online learning click

Online is an overused word in the world of education – it gets used to describe everything from MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) through to correspondence courses which have their DNA back in the early 1990s. Then there is everything in between, including highly-templated courses through to high-end, high-impact game based models of learning. 

This is confusing and must be difficult for a potential student or industry client to comprehend if they haven’t either a) grown up in the industry or b) conducted a significant amount of purchaser diligence. So, for those who don’t meet either a) or b) of the above here are a few tips to consider when looking at Online (that word again!) courses:

1. Is the organisation offering the course the same as the one who actually delivers the training? This doesn’t necessarily have to be the same but I’d want to know who the training partner behind the brochure is. That way, I know where my real time is going to be spent and with whom.

2. What does the training partner promote first? If it is study now, pay later then fine, but what about the outcomes? (Personally I’m more interested in the effort/reward relationship of study and the opportunities that come out of this rather than whether I can add to my debt pile.)

3. What is the student experience like? Can I talk to an existing student and/or online teacher? If not, how many complete the course/qualification? If it’s low, why?

Once these areas are understood the decision between course types, Online vs other types of study, becomes that bit clearer: know what questions to ask and the decisions should in theory become easier to make.​

For our own business – Chisholm Online – we’ve taken the view that the learning content and support are key ingredients for a good student experience. Likewise, the high impact learning often comes from the students’ online tutor. That’s why we spend a lot of time on each part – recruiting the best available tutors and making sure that students’ get the level of support they need within a structured and open learning environment. Our 2015 New Year’s resolution could be summarised as looking to grow bigger but only if we can also grow better.​

Item is currently unrated.What does an online learning world look like for you?Post13/11/2015 11:17 AM22013/11/2015 11:18 AMKate TelferWhat does an online learning world look like for you?Theo Teeder
Online is an overused word in the world of education – it gets used to describe everything from MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) through to correspondence courses which have their DNA back in the early 1990s. Then there is everything in between, including highly-templated courses through to high-end, high-impact game based models of learning.
Kate Telfer10/11/2014 12:17 PMOpinions0Keep calm

Spending more than your lunchbreak dreaming about a new career? Or are you finding you just don’t like the commute to work anymore? Perhaps you are wondering how you are going to climb a corporate ladder that just doesn’t exist? Okay, stop what you’re doing, take a deep breath and ask yourself if you might be having a mid-career crisis?

No need to panic! Don’t run out and find a new car or book that overseas holiday just yet! It’s not unusual to feel the mid-career blues. Many people get to a point where they seriously question whether they want to continue doing the same thing day in, day out for the next 20 years. In fact, one of the reasons that Steve Jobs became so easily quotable was the fact he became an easy figure to identify with when it came to having “the courage to follow your heart and intuition”. He got it that to work hard and to be motivated in what you do takes not only courage but also a degree of planning and perseverance.

If this sounds like you, now could be just the right time to re-evaluate your career path or make a career change. Once you have explored the avenues for change or transition within your current organization, consider whether the things you’re missing could be found outside work? Do you need to further your skills or expand on your degree and diplomacy?

Day dreaming may help you explore your options, but guided thinking can direct your ideas in more concrete, helpful directions. Take time to explore what opportunities to learn are available.

Guided thinking is about getting that balance between meaningful next steps and recognising what the final outcome is. These are really important in retaining motivation and rewarding effort as you embark on this change of direction and potential study. As an Online education organisation we get this and have built our student support and learning materials to be flexible to use. Support in particular that suits the need of individual learners. So, back to that mid-career crisis: a career change is possible while you maintain your current job or status at home. You can transition slowly while learning a new skill or expedite to a new career with a new qualification while remaining in control and on course.​

Call one of our Student Engagement officers today on 1300 275 265 and discuss your options. It could be just the change you need to follow your heart!

Item is currently unrated.Is your mid career crisis holding you back?Post13/11/2015 12:17 PM23013/11/2015 12:18 PMKate TelferIs your mid career crisis holding you back?Theo Teeder
​Spending more than your lunchbreak dreaming about a new career? Or are you finding you just don’t like the commute to work anymore? Perhaps you are wondering how you are going to climb a corporate ladder that just doesn’t exist? Okay, stop what you’re doing, take a deep breath and ask yourself if you might be having a mid-career crisis?​